Tesla Model 3 owners must pay to Supercharge, no 400 kWh of free use

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by gene, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. gene

    gene Moderator

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    #1 gene, Oct 17, 2017
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    The first Tesla Model 3 owners are starting to discover the costs associated with using the company’s fast charging Supercharger network.

    Unlike Tesla’s flagship Model S and Model X vehicles that come bundled with roughly 1,000 miles of free Supercharging each year, unless the vehicle was purchased through Tesla’s referral program which would entitle the buyer to free unlimited Supercharger use, Model 3 buyers must pay for the amount of energy being used at each Supercharger stall.

    Early Model 3 owner PTFI shared on Twitter their associated cost for charging at the popular Harris Ranch Supercharger station, located halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. The ‘Supercharger fee’ being charged by Tesla varies by region and by charging tier.



    For North America, pricing is fixed within each state and charged per minute and based on a per killowatt-hour rate. For Model 3 owner PTFI, one can see from the tweet that their charge session in California cost $8.60 based on energy usage billed at $.20/kWh. The 43 kWh of energy drawn from Tesla’s Supercharger backs into roughly 167 miles of range, still cheaper than the amount of gas needed to travel the same distance.

    Tesla’s Supercharger pricing structure also takes into account a vehicle’s battery state of charge at the time it’s Supercharging, also referred to as a charging tier.

    Despite Model 3 drivers needing to pay for Supercharger usage, the convenience of having access to a fast and reliable charging network: one that Tesla has committed to rapidly scaling on a global level, makes it a compelling option to have especially if the price point for charging is cheaper than the cost of refueling a comparable gasoline car.

    “Supercharging is simple and convenient—just plug in and charge up. Supercharging history is automatically populated in your Tesla Account showing the credits used or, if applicable, the amount billed. Tesla is committed to ensuring that Supercharger will never be a profit center.” says Tesla.

    Article: Tesla Model 3 owners must pay to Supercharge, no 400 kWh of free use
     
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  2. darylal

    darylal New Member

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    Is this a surprise to anyone? I never remember reading anything but wishful speculation about any free supercharging for the Model3. Can't see having to use it myself except for long trips in which case I would be fine with paying for it.
     
  3. L-squared

    L-squared New Member

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    @darylal, my sentiments exactly. There's no free lunch. The base price of the Model 3 is about ½ that of the Model S base price, so free Supercharging is a benefit you get for paying that much for the S that you don't get with the cheaper Model 3. The Supercharger is still cheaper than gas on a per mile basis, so overall it's a good deal. And like you, I also plan to charge at home except on long trips, when I would be very happy to be able to use a Supercharging station for fast charging.
     
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  4. bcsteeve

    bcsteeve Member

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    Well... the only "problem" is that it kinda makes Musk a liar. Sure, it was years ago and sure it was never going to be realistic... but it came out of his mouth on record.

    That's a direct quote. See for yourself.

    Argue all you want that he "meant" for the S and X and that the 3 didn't exist then, but according to his well publicized master plan(s), the three was always in the cards. And in that quote he doesn't mention any cars... he mentions the chargers themselves as being "free forever".

    Forever didn't last long.
     
  5. darylal

    darylal New Member

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    That was 2013. Really dude, get over it. As the rest of us that actually have EV know this is not an issue or "problem".
     
  6. bcsteeve

    bcsteeve Member

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    Excuse me "dude", but I don't need to "get over it". I was pointing out the falsehood. "Forever" - to most intelligent people anyway - means longer than four years.

    I've got a P85D... somehow I don't "actually have EV"? (ie. shove your smug attitude up your ironically metaphorical tailpipe)
     
  7. GrandPoobah

    GrandPoobah Member

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    If that's the worst lie that Elon can come up with, I can live with it ... especially with what we have to compare him with these days.:D
     
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  8. bcsteeve

    bcsteeve Member

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    Absolutely! It probably isn't the worst... the man says a lot of details that turn out to be nothing but smoke... but it doesn't come anywhere near the amazing things he's said he'd do that actually did come to be.
     
  9. RFP

    RFP New Member

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    Hello.
    Hopefully, someone can explain the usage/cost/mpg to me It seems that 167 miles = $8.60. I pay ~$2.50 per gallon for gas (for my Prius) so if I divide the electricity (charge) cost (8.60) by 2.50 = 3.44 gallons and at the 54mpg I get routinely this would be 186 miles. If I've missed something in my analysis (which is entirely possible) didn't I read recently that the comparison from the EPA? was ~ 100 mpg. I really want the 3 but I thought that some of the premium price (I know some will say that for 35 -49K it is not a premium) was for low cost per mile. Comments? Ron
     
  10. bcsteeve

    bcsteeve Member

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    #10 bcsteeve, Oct 19, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2017
    Hello Ron,

    Your "mistake" in your math... if we can call it that... is that money doesn't come into a mpg calculation. MPG is a consumption/environmental measurement, not a cost analysis. Your way of calculating is certainly reasonable - since cost matters - but that is why you're not getting the "proper" mpg equivelent.

    When making mpge (mile per gallon equivelent) calculations for EV, they use 33.7 KWh of electricity as being the same as a gallon of gas. 43 KWh was mentioned in this article as getting them 167 miles. Of course that is entirely anecdotal, but if we take 43 and divide by 33.7 that trip used the equivelent of 1.276 gallons. That's 130.9 miles per "gallon".

    The fact that electricity is expensive (at a Supercharger, which is rarely used in the course of a normal user's ownership - you'll charge mostly at home, hopefully at much lower rates) and gas is cheap (since it doesn't take into more than a tiny fraction of the actual cost of using it - pollution, health, etc) doesn't change that calculation. But it does, apparently, change your value calculations. That's up to you.

    I would *hope*/suggest that perhaps you could look at it less about money and more about ending fossil fuel usage. But given that you're already driving the greenest non-EV on the planet... I can't really say you aren't doing your part.
     
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  11. Falcon57

    Falcon57 New Member

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    A Prius is not a good comparison. How about an Audi or Mercedes getting 1/2 that mileage? On premium gas that costs at Harris Ranch 4 bucks a gallon. Compare that. A Prius is a great car. Not near as good/fast/comfortable as any Tesla.
     
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  12. bcsteeve

    bcsteeve Member

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    Completely disagree with that. The best, and frankly only, comparison when considering whether or not to replace one's vehicle... is that vehicle being replaced and/or whatever other vehicle is being considered. His vehicle is a Prius... that simply *is* his point of comparison, whether or not that is "good" in your opinion.

    Before picking up my S, I compared it to my Honda Fit. Because that was the choice I faced.

    A random Mercedes or BMW is a bad comparison to me because there's no universe where I would consider one (until they are measured in watts instead of gallons).

    I think it is disgustingly irresponsible at this point in history to compare the Tesla with any new pure ICE vehicle on the market.
     
  13. RFP

    RFP New Member

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    Thanks for the appropriate look from another direction which makes me feel good. I think the Prius is a fine car and intend to pass it along to make someone else happy. That will leave me with the 3 as the daily driver and a '90 300SL as my garage queen; it gets about 22mpg on expensive Shell V-Power. Ron
     
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