Tesla Model 3 has an 80.5 kWh battery and 258HP according to EPA document

Discussion in 'In the News' started by Mike Dolzer, Aug 7, 2017.

  1. Mike Dolzer

    Mike Dolzer New Member

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    #1 Mike Dolzer, Aug 7, 2017
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    The EPA released its Certification Summary Information Report of Tesla’s Model 3, and it contains some new information on battery specifications and horsepower rating for the premium electric sedan.

    According to the EPA filing, the long range Model 3 that’s capable of 310 miles per single charge uses a battery pack rated at 350 volts with a capacity of 230Ah. Multiplying the two figures together and we can see that Model 3 uses an 80.5 kWh battery pack.

    Also seen in the EPA document via InsideEVs is a reference to Model 3’s 258 rated horsepower. It’s important to note that the performance figure is for the first production long range Model 3 which is equipped with a single electric motor and comes standard in a rear wheel drive only configuration. According to Tesla CEO Elon Musk, the performance variant of the Model 3 in all wheel drive is expected to arrive in mid-2018. One can expect a Model 3 “P” to have well over 400 horsepower in a dual motor set up.



    InsideEVs notes that “although Tesla CEO Elon Musk previously stated that the Model 3 can’t fit more than 75 kWh of battery, his reference could’ve well been to useable, not max capacity of the pack, so the numbers still fit in with his past statement.”

    The EPA Certification Summary report points to an “END-SOC” or state of charge level of 78270 watt-hours or 78.2 kWh of useable battery capacity.

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    The figures reported by the EPA have not yet been confirmed by Tesla.

    All in all, it looks as if the Model 3 with a 3,837 pound curb weight (1,740 kg) will be one of the most efficient vehicles in modern history. You can read the EPA document in full here.

    Article: Tesla Model 3 has an 80.5 kWh battery and 258HP according to EPA document
     
  2. Not_Mandatory

    Not_Mandatory Member

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    FINALLY some hard data that we can use for the Model 3.

    Okay, so here's some back-of-the-envelope math given this new data:

    We now know the long-range Model 3 has an 80 kWh battery pack, and that it is rated at 310 miles of range. That gives us 80,000 Wh / 310 miles = 258 Wh/mi "efficiency".

    We can then use that 258 Wh/mi figure to extrapolate that the "base model" 3, with its 220 miles of range, likely has a very slightly lower Wh/mi rating (the value is lower, meaning it's more efficient, because the battery pack is lighter), and plugging in 250 Wh/mi efficiency with 220 miles of range gives us exactly 55,000 Wh, or a 55kWh battery pack for the base model.
     
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  3. vdiv

    vdiv Member

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    So why couldn't Tesla be upfront with this information? Why did they feel compelled not to disclose it? What else are they hiding?
     
  4. Marcos Cunha

    Marcos Cunha New Member

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    i think the long range model has performance enough
     
  5. Michael Russo

    Michael Russo Moderator

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    Just caught up with this on Twitter in my very first Uber ride ever.... on way to ATL airport!

     
  6. vincent wolf

    vincent wolf Member

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    You trust the EPA to accurately measure anything? After working with them for 15 years as an analytical chemist trust me you shouldn't be so trusting!!
     
  7. Cloxxki

    Cloxxki New Member

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    If that full 78.2kWh is to be needed for 310 miles, it's not too shockingly more efficient than Model S. Narrower, lighter, yet does not go hugely further on 1kWh.
    Let's hope some reserve is kept on to of anti-bric to maintain range as the battery degrades with use and over time.
     
  8. Michael Russo

    Michael Russo Moderator

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    Remember T≡SLA batteries, on the base of Model S experience, have demonstrated very little battery degradation after extended use, compared to other EVs, notably the Leaf...
     
  9. Cloxxki

    Cloxxki New Member

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    Could that not be largely or fully be contributed to have by far the largest batteries on the market, and people just driving like people do? If the Tesla has 3x the battery, will owners buy them to do 3x the mileage and end up with the same cycles?
    Also, A Tesla owner is more likely in the position to use home charging than a Nissan owner.
    Leafs may get higher utilization and thus degradation. At least they did not haul around batteries they'd seldom use fully.

    Any better ideas why Model 3 would need such a big battery for 310 miles? Or is it 330 as has been vaguely hinted on some forum reportedly quoted a Tesla engineer?
     
  10. Michael Russo

    Michael Russo Moderator

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    Not sure what you mean, if I remember correctly the Model S75 gets 265 miles, 310 is 45 miles or 15% more. Maybe not 'shocking' yet certainly notable...
    There are reports of Model S having driven several hundred thousand miles with less than 8% battery degradation...
    I don't think the number of T≡SLA cars or the amount of home charging have much to do with the Leaf battery technology being far inferior in terms of usable life compared to T≡SLA. That is according to current owners of both brands of cars...
    310 miles is a phenomenal range, currently only exceeded in the S range by the much larger battery 100D. Not sure why you are referring to the LRB as 'such a big battery'.

    To your point, the extra 20 miles have been mooted as achievable with the Aero (or UWCs... as some of call them on M3OC ;)) covers, on the standard 18'' wheels... check out Episod 22 of the M3OC YouTube video show (under Media).
     
  11. Cloxxki

    Cloxxki New Member

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    Consumption was expected (not announced) to be super low. It's not, apparently. Low for a Tesla, not for an EV per say.

    I was quoting the 78.2kWh of usable energy on this 3LR. Model S75 has 72.6kWh (which actually seems high). 8% right there.

    That said, though...
    It's hard to find official EPA consumption figures on the S75 RWD. Did they change over time? 265mi seems on the high end, I found 595mi for S75D. And let's not compare TM3 RWD to S75D :)

    249mi for S75: https://speakev.com/threads/model-s-60-60d-and-75-75d-mileage-range-for-new-orders-info.19078/
     

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