Tesla completes first Solar Roof installations on employee homes, pilot production remains at Frem

Discussion in 'In the News' started by teslarati, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. teslarati

    teslarati Administrator

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    #1 teslarati, Aug 2, 2017
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    Tesla has announced that the first Solar Roof installations have been completed on the homes of select employees including CEO Elon Musk’s home. “I have it on my house, JB has it on his house,” said Musk during Wednesday’s earnings call. By having employees be the first customers of its glass roof tile, Tesla has been able to maintain a tight feedback loop with the end user, allowing the company to flush out final field testing of its energy generation and storage products.

    “The first Solar Roof installations have been completed recently at the homes of our employees, who we chose to be our first customers to help perfect all aspects of Solar Roof customer experience. By pairing either Solar Roof or our existing retrofit solar panels with a Powerwall, our customers can enjoy sustainable energy independence.” said Tesla in its Second Quarter 2017 Update Letter published after Wednesday’s closing bell.

    [​IMG]Tesla teased a photo of its employee Solar Roof installation on the 2017 Second Quarter Update Letter

    Tesla also noted that pilot production of the tempered glass Solar Roof tiles, which has been awarded ASTM International’s best Class F wind rating and certified by Underwriters Laboratories with its highest Class A fire rating, continues to take place from the Fremont facility. Production will begin at Tesla’s Gigafactory 2 plant in Buffalo, New York before the end of the year.

    As Solar Roof installations continue to increase, so does Tesla’s hiring for skilled contractors.  Dozens of new jobs for skilled roofers, primarily in California, that must have “roofing experience; including metal, concrete tile, clay tile, comp, shingle, or wood shake”. Compared to traditional roofing, installing a rooftop comprised of thousands of individual solar tiles that must be installed with perfection and wired together puts a completely new spin on traditional roofing.

    An in depth Tesla Solar Roof cost analysis by Consumer Reports recently revealed that the investment makes sense in many areas of the nation, however a traditional flat panel solar system may provide even bigger cost savings. To find out if solar makes sense in your area, consider getting a solar cost estimate.

    Article: Tesla completes first Solar Roof installations on employee homes, pilot production remains at Fremont
     
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  2. Ctesibios

    Ctesibios New Member

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    I suppose you can walk on the tiles?
     
  3. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    #3 joeski1, Aug 7, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
    Apparently there is little existing criteria for solar roof installations as there are for existing typical solar installs.. I see trees in both examples of this roof. Trees will definitely impact solar production with shading..
    In most states in the US, grid connection is based on many topographic considerations and the value of possible generation verses cost of installation.
    Installing a 100K roof on a home with shading impacting overall performance demeans the return on the product. It may never pay for it's overall cost.
    That is why most reputable solar firms do a location based solar study to determine whether installing solar pv actually makes economic sense.. a system that can't recover it's capital cost in less than 10 years is not usually a good buy.
    Nj consumer energy program demands such a test before approvals are granted.. every aspect of the install is identified against the progtam's standards for the install..
    If you wanna blow your cash on something that is less than beneficial, it's okay with them.. but it's your loss, not the programs.
     
  4. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    Yup..stronger than steel...able to leap.... oops...

    Judging from the radical pitch on the homes pictured.. not likely...

    shoes with suction cups.
     
  5. Jeff Sutherland

    Jeff Sutherland New Member

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    #5 Jeff Sutherland, Aug 7, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
    I've done two solar installations in Massachusetts. In both cases I filled multiple roofs with the maximum number of panels that generate 2-3 times the electricity I need. The largest one's payback is four years. The smaller one, even after negotiating with the Public Utilities Commission, I had to pay the utility $40K to upgrade electrical lines and a transformer for a $40K solar installation (the utilities are a big ripoff). This delayed payback to about 10 years. I think the solar roof numbers would work out similarly if I needed a new roof and it would look a lot better.

    I've got so much electricity I am going to have to give some away or start mining bitcoin. I think I could cut the payback time in half by mining bitcoin on the smallar installation. In the meantime I am installing 10 Powerwalls on the large installation which will allow me to run offgrid for about 10 months of the year and provide backup. The free electricity I have now plus the SRECS I get every year will pay for the Powerwalls in less than four years.

    You have to get your state legislators to stop being lapdogs for the utilities. At the same time, set up your system so no matter what back room deals the utilities cut to save their executive bonuses for building losing systems, you don't need them.
     
  6. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    #6 joeski1, Aug 7, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
    Nj. Law prohits residential energy generation in excess of prior annual household use... by law, a solar pv system can not generate more than 95% of that household energy use for the prior energy years and be approved into the Nj CEP..
    I was not permitted to add additional solar pv until my energy use again exceeded my yearly solar production.. I had to prove this through an energy use audit. and it occurred only after I took possession of my ms 90d..
    Without that added demand...I could not get approved for additional solar. Also our town recently ordinanced a 10K residential limit on solar pv.. which passed with no abstaining vote 2 years ago..
    Be careful before you take some salesperson's BS when it comes to solar.
    I also can find no financial gain to installing a PowerWall system in a grid tied home.. which..is also required for both SRECS .and the local town ordinance.
    Check solarpowerrocks.com for laws directly related to your area before even thinking about it.
     
  7. Jeff Sutherland

    Jeff Sutherland New Member

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    #7 Jeff Sutherland, Aug 7, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
    Fortunately I don't live in NJ where the utilities apparently have the legislature in their back pocket. I suggest you start political action to change the law and allow consumers to generate, share, and resell their electricity to each other. Failing that, I suggest you go completely off grid and file enough lawsuits to make it happen.

    The main gain for installing Powerwalls in my home is backup in the event of utility power failure which is common and wreaks havoc on my computer networks, not to mention that it shuts down my solar and shuts down my heat. My utility has short term power outages every week and last week brought down six computer systems in my lab while I was on vacation even though all systems are on a UPS. I had to get a computer expert to travel 100 miles to bring up the systems. The Powerwalls will completely eliminate this nonsense.

    My backup is set to give me a day or more electricity if the power goes out in the winter with temperature -20 and snow on the solar panels so no solar generation. My heat runs off an electric geothermal system which needs to be online. The backup design was worked out carefully with the Tesla power experts. I think I could sustain this even in a court of law in New Jersey.
     
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