Tales from a Tesla Model S that hit 400,000 miles in 3 years

Discussion in 'Model S' started by simonalvarez0987, Jul 16, 2018.

  1. simonalvarez0987

    simonalvarez0987 Active Member

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    #1 simonalvarez0987, Jul 16, 2018
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    Tesloop, a Tesla-only intercity shuttle service for Southern California commuters, has reached another milestone with its Model S 90D. In a recent announcement, the company revealed that their Model S, dubbed eHawk, has passed the 400,000-mile mark, making it as one of the highest mileage Teslas in the world today.

    eHawk entered service on July 2015, driving from city to city in Southern California and Nevada. By February 2016, the Model S 90D had logged its first 100,000 miles, and by August that year, the full-sized family sedan passed the 200,000-mile mark. In a recent blog post, Tesloop stated that roughly 90% of eHawk’s trips were driven using Autopilot, with Pilots (as the company refers to its drivers) only taking over active driving duties when needed. Tesloop’s Model S 90D currently travels an average of 17,000 miles per month. On the company’s recent post, Haydn Sonnad, Tesloop’s founder, expressed his optimism for the coming years.

    “Vehicle connectivity is about to transform the car ownership and user experience. We are close to the point where increasingly sophisticated autonomous driving features and deep connectivity are coupled with electric drivetrains that last hundreds of thousands of miles, a whole new approach to mobility can be offered, that will transform the economics of car ownership and usage, while offering a greatly superior customer experience,” he said.

    Over the past 3 years and through 400,000 miles on the road, eHawk has accumulated roughly $19,000 worth of maintenance costs, equating to about $0.05 per miles. This cost is broken down to $6,700 for general vehicle repairs and $12,200 for regularly scheduled maintenance. According to the company’s estimates, a Lincoln Town Car or a Mercedes-Benz GLS class would have accumulated maintenance costs of $88,500 ($0.22/mile) and $98,900 ($0.25/mile), respectively, had the vehicles been driven for 400,000 miles.

    The Model S 90D’s high voltage (HV) battery unit was replaced twice under warranty since July 2015. The first battery HV battery replacement was at 194,000 miles, while the second was at 324,000 miles. Average battery degradation over the vehicle’s first 194,000 miles was around 6% with multiple Supercharger stops every day. Between 194,000 - 324,000 miles, the HV battery degradation was estimated at around 22%. According to Tesloop, this was likely due to the company’s practice of constantly charging eHawk to 95-100%, instead of Tesla’s recommended 90-95%. On its blog post, Tesloop shared Tesla’s reminder to the company after its first HV battery replacement. 

    “Found internal imbalance in HV battery due to consistent supercharging to 100% from a low state of charge (SOC) without any rest periods in between. HV battery has been approved to be replaced. Also recommend that customer does not Supercharge on a regular basis and does not charge to 100% on a regular basis. We also recommend that the customer use scheduled charging to start charge 3 hours after end of drive at low SOC.”

    [​IMG]The interior of Tesloop’s Tesla Model S 90D after being in service for 400,000 miles. [Credit: Tesloop]

    Apart from its HV battery, Tesloop’s Model S 90D also had its front drive unit replaced under warranty at 36,000 miles. No issues with the vehicle’s drive units have emerged since. The Tesla-exclusive shuttle service also opted to upgrade the rear seating of eHawk to the executive seat option for maximum passenger comfort. According to the company, the seats have held up well over the thousands of passengers the electric car has transported over the years.

    Considering the endurance showcased by its Model S 90D, Tesloop estimates that eHawk should be able to last another 600,000 miles over the next five years. If the vehicle achieves this, it would be the first Tesla Model S to reach the 1 million-mile mark.

    Tesloop currently operates a fleet of Model S and Model X vehicles. One of its Model X, a 90D named Rex, also achieved its own milestone last month, after it hit 300,000 miles on the road since being deployed. When the all-electric SUV reached the 300,000-mile mark, its battery degradation was estimated at roughly 10%. Since achieving its milestone, however, Tesla has changed the vehicle’s rear drive unit.

    Article: Tales from a Tesla Model S that hit 400,000 miles in 3 years
     
  2. Milan B

    Milan B Member

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    I thought i drove quite a bit putting 40K miles on a year. this does go to show that the build quality is good. all cars no matter what power train will have some issues. after all there are moving parts and those parts do wear out over time. i am also very happy to see that tesla replaced the battery under warranty.
     
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  3. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    #3 joeski1, Jul 17, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
    Yeah... go right ahead...

    Just "discount" the entire cost of 2 full 90KW battery packs installed?

    They didn't cost anything. ?? TESLA picked up the cost out of their kind and good nature.. uh huh.

    BS..

    Inconvenience, downtime, add $75, 000 or more to that number for 2 battery packs plus all related labor and lost revenue.. how long was the vehicle down for during these battery failures?

    Do tell.. what warranty extends the battary coverage to 194K?

    TESLA is in effect.. de facto SPONSORING this endeavor.. or EVERY TESLA owner leasee should get free unlimited lifetime battery pack replacement.

    I'll be ready to ask for mine should need be.

    I'll be sure to note this post should I encounter a resistant shop adviser..

    Let's see where that goes
     
  4. jedi2155

    jedi2155 New Member

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    I have multiple issues with this article, the first and foremost being that it does not sound very impressive for a vehicle to have a drive motor replaced at 36,000 miles, and have 2 battery pack replacements over the life of the vehicle. Sounds rather mediocre, but within my expectations for a Tesla vehicle/ICE vehicle but not so great for general EV reliability.

    So I looked into this and recalled that Tesla has a 8 year/unlimited miles warranty on their Battery/Drive Train on the higher end models of the S/X.

    https://www.tesla.com/support/vehicle-warranty-ms-mx
     
  5. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    #5 joeski1, Jul 17, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
    Ok... so while that may be true... how many will roll 400000 in 4 years?

    Or 8 unless being used for hire..

    this drivetrain and battery warranty is extended to a vehicle driven for known commercial purposes standard.?

    What about drag raced @ public drag strips in competition?

    Maybe I baby my MS 90D too much. Uber and Lyft both pepper me with driving offers but my lease and car insurance specifically forbid it unless declared.

    But really...

    This wear cycle is akin to 2 complete engine overhauls and one transmission so far... still not what what my 40 years of shop time would deem better enough to claim "lower maintenance."..

    And the downtime for each component is not factored in..

    Were these parts waiting in the shop to go right in when the tow truck arrived?

    If so... why do other folks have to wait so long to get parts?

    Even the ServiceKing guy told me.. no more quotes on TESLA collision repairs till I get the 3 in my shop waiting on parts (and jamming up my bays) outta here..
     
  6. Milan B

    Milan B Member

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    apparently the answer is YES. at least based on what i read in this article.
     
  7. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    Wow...

    And TESLA have the audacity to gripe about folks using the superchargers too much?

    Electric is nothing compared to giving battery packs away to commercial businesses.
     
  8. Milan B

    Milan B Member

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    WOW. i have never heard anyone complain about charging too much at the supercharger. Where and when did you experience this? What was the name of the Tesla Ranger that confronted you? please give details such that we can insure other Tesla owners are informed. What i like best about the forums is that we have the ability to collectively voice our experiences. Mine have all be positive. not a single negative item. In fact the rangers have gone out of their way to be helpful.
     
  9. joeski1

    joeski1 Member

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    #9 joeski1, Jul 17, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
    TESLA sent out "knock it off " letters a few years back to " excessive supercharger use clients"

    This was documented.. prior to the new fee and penalty structure.

    I do 95% of my charging @ home off my 10.01k solar pv array..

    I hardly use the supercharger network.. but I'll never think twice about it again..

    No wonder the Kind Bars and quality beverages are gone from the service wait areas..

    90kw battery packs are pretty expensive.
     
  10. Milan B

    Milan B Member

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    Please provide copies or a link to this document. thank you in advance.
     
  11. Andy867

    Andy867 New Member

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  12. Milan B

    Milan B Member

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    Old email from 2015, i believe Tesla has matured past this. combined with the proliferation of superchargers means it is no longer a concern.
     

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