Developing Countries

Discussion in 'Tesla Energy' started by Goliver, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. Goliver

    Goliver New Member

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    I spent 40 years doing business in developing countries in Asia and LatAm. Power supply there is erratic and expensive: Brazil, Mexico, India, Thailand, China, Burma, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam, Philippines.... all have large populations and suffer from blackouts, brownouts, power surges, you name it. I know for a fact that consistent and reliable power supply is a key consideration for investors.

    There is a huge opportunity for both Powerpack and Powerwall units in these markets. I sincerely hope that Tesla is exploring export sales opportunities not just in developed places like Western Europe, Canada, etc but also in the developing world where there is enormous demand.
     
  2. gene

    gene Moderator

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    I can't imagine they won't but I'm sure it's just a matter of economics initially. They are on the "Roadster version" of their energy storage systems right now and aim to drive costs down with the "Model 3 version" of Powerwall one day.
     
  3. Fairestcape

    Fairestcape New Member

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    See my post re: Australia...

    The conundrum relating to affordability is this. The parts of the world that best lend themselves to sunshine harvesting also tend to be the poorest (socio-economically). Massive tracts of Africa (for example) are hot, cloudless, unpopulated and in almost every sense "desolate". The Sahara desert is an ideal place locate sunshine harvesters - but-:

    1. Who would use this energy?
    2. How could it be transported (over great distances) to places where it can be used?

    Nikola Tesla claimed that he had found ways to transmit energy over large distances with very little attrition (loss of power). Whether his ideas were hare-brained or not was never properly tested, and much research (probably involving principles of quantum mechanics) needs to be done to ascertain the validity of his ideas.

    But maybe here's an idea...

    Combine the principles of the high-speed hyperloop with the generation and storage of electricity. Set up huge solar farms in the northern Sahara (several hundred square km) and charge batteries on-site. Then, using the hyperloop, transport charged batteries to places in Europe (where people prefer to live). Depleted batteries are returned to the farms and the cycle continues. The power needed to operate the hyperloops is provided by a portion of the battery power thus transported (at destination) and by the farms (at source).

    Given projections for the speed at which the hyperloop pods can move, a "round trip" from North Africa to Southern Europe may take as little as an hour and a half..
     
  4. Fairestcape

    Fairestcape New Member

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    ... or perhaps consider this... Right now, we harvest our fossil fuels from remote places and then transport them (supertankers and long pipelines) to places where the are most-needed / consumed.

    Do the same with the batteries... afterall a charged Li-Ion battery holds its charge extremely well. Charge them up in hot sunny places and ship them to where they are needed.

    A big advantage is that the ships return full (with depleted batteries) instead of empty tanks (which is the current situation).

    Power the ships with solar, perhaps? Maybe too ambitous - The deck surface area of the world's largest tankers is around 9,000 square metres. Approximately 9 square meters is required for a 1 kW capacity photovoltaic system (National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2010a). So the daily power generation capacity could be as high as 1mW... which (sadly) is around just 2% of the required power output needed to drive the damned thing in the first place.

    (Unless they use 25% of their cargo to make up the difference. Another 25% needed for the return journey... as this energy is virtually "free" it does not matter so much that half of the energy in the cargo is used to power the vessels.)

    Can someone do the math here?
     

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